Can I Or May I Go To The Bathroom?

Why is it May I instead of can I?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English.

The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other.

In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may..

Is loo more polite than toilet?

Toilet. … It’s a harsh word that was adapted from the French toilette which means your appearance, hence toiletries bag. Lavatory or loo is much more acceptable.

Can I help you vs May I help you?

“How may I help you?” is what one would ask, for instance, if serving at a shop of some sort. “How can I help you?” is what one would ask if unsure about the nature or type of assistance one can offer.

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

When to say may I?

As for May I at the start of a sentence, its commonest use is as a rhetorical device – typically in a speech or official meeting – for introducing a statement or suggestion (rather than a question): May I say how deeply honoured I am to be invited to chair the NCVO.

Can a teacher deny bathroom?

Yes, a teacher can say “no” to allowing a student to use the bathroom. Every teacher knows that some students will ask to use the restroom whether they really need to go or not. … The first rule is that no student is allowed to use the bathroom during direct instruction.

Can I come in or may I come in?

“Can” is about ability while “may” is about permission, so “can you come” (are you able to come) and “may I come” (do I have permission to come) are the right forms there. When asking someone else to meet/join you, you may also see “will you” (are you agreeable to this).

Can I go to the bathroom vs May I?

The “joke” here is based on the insistence that you should use may when asking for permission to do something, and can when speaking about ability. By this logic, the student should have said “May I go to the bathroom?” since their ability to use the facilities is likely not in question.

How do you politely ask to go to the bathroom?

Ask to use the bathroom. Raise your hand, wait patiently to be called on, and ask for permission to use the restroom. “May I please go to the restroom, Mr./Mrs/Ms. ____.” Raise your hand with the special signal (perhaps crossed fingers) and patiently wait for a response.

Where do we use may?

Uses of May and MightPermission.May is used to express permission. May not is used to deny permission.Notes.Possibility.May is also used to express possibility.May is also used in expressing a wish.May is used in subordinate clauses that express a purpose.Might.More items…•

Can could may grammar?

When we talk about possibility, we use can, could and may, but they are different in meaning. It can be dangerous to cycle in the city. This expresses what the speaker believes is a general truth or known fact, or a strong possibility. It could/may be dangerous to cycle in the city.

What mean May?

1a —used to indicate possibility or probabilityyou may be rightthings you may need —sometimes used interchangeably with canone of those slipups that may happen from time to time— Jessica Mitford —sometimes used where might would be expectedyou may think from a little distance that the country was solid woods— Robert …

Can I or may I Which is correct?

Which do you think is correct? If you use “Can I…” you are literally asking if you have the ability to pick the book up from the person’s hands, walk away with it, and return it later. If you use “May I…” then you are asking permission to use the book and bring it back at a later time.

Is Loo rude?

The word loo is not rude, as you can tell from this link http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/loo?q=loo. It’s just an informal/colloquial word in the UK. It’s as simple as that. The word restroom is not really used in the UK, as is John in this context.